Home Logo
Cerrar home
32

SILVIA JARAMILLO

Place of birth:

Newark, New Jersey

Family Heritage:

Ecuador

Education:

Computer Science Major Student

Current job:

Student, Villanova Universty

Bio

I am currently a freshman Computer Engineering major at Villanova University in Pennsylvania. My plan is to continue my major in Computer Engineering, accompanied with minors in Computer Science and a language. I have been involved in computing for the past two years. I started my first internship at First Round Capital, a venture capital company focused on investments in technology-based startups. After earning exposure in software through the guidance of software-engineers-turned-entrepreneurs, I took a deeper interest in computing. For the past two summers, I have interned for the Office of Naval Research at the Naval Surface Warfare Center-Carderock Division in Philadelphia, PA. Working on programming projects and naval research and development lead to a growing interest in computer engineering, cybersecurity, and naval research that I would like to continue pursuing.

Bio

Aside from interning, the computing experience I earned has been offered to me through hackathons, local colleges, and online sources. I started the first public chapter of the national organization Girls Who Code and helped start additional chapters in my hometown of Newark, New Jersey. The AspireIT program, Culture Tech Cadets, I cofounded is an addition to the growing opportunities for Newark’s students interested in STEM. My interest in computing and engineering has grown with every step I have taken toward pursuing my interests and leading others to the same path.

Why would you recommend exploring careers in science and technology to other Latina girls?

I share this world of technology and science with countless young Latina women who have the opportunity to succeed. Some Latina girls have been exposed to different fields of science and technology and are pursuing those fields. Some Latina girls have unclear perceptions of the range of science and technology fields. At the age of 13, I finally had total access to a computer and it was not until three years later that I discovered computer science. Limited resources in computing at my high school and in my area did not refrain me from seeking learning opportunities at hackathons, local colleges, and online. As Latina girls pursuing science and technology, we drive away the statistics of female minorities pursuing STEM and embrace our chance to be a Latina in technology.

My hope is that more female Latina students learn about computer science as early as they can. Science and technology is advancing by the second; it works in EVERYONE’S favor to learn more about the fields sooner. For young Latina girls, the opportunity to pursue a career in science and technology is the very opportunity that makes us TECHNOLOchicas. I want more TECHNOLOchicas to say que sí se puede y que llegamos a nuestros éxitos. Somos TECHNOLOchicas!